May 09 2016

Long distance moving rates are out of control

I was looking at a few relocation scenarios. Some observations:

  1. Long-distance moves are helluva expensive. FedEx quoted me $500 to move a 40 lb box from Chicago to Tokyo. That’s around 10x per pound-mile what NASA would pay for a trip to the moon. Also, FedEx insurance is extra, and you’re definitely not getting any moon rocks.
  2. Even long-distance moves within the U.S. are fairly expensive. For a small Chicago-DC move, the least ridiculous Potomac mover was a few thousand dollars (495 Movers). If I drive it in myself, I think there’s a 10%+ chance of a major accident, decapitation, and/or high speed chase*, so hiring a moving company might actually be cheaper in the long run.

*My driving is so bad I once got in a low-speed chase with a possibly sober deputy by accident. If you’re comfortable driving 6+ hrs without incident, I’d recommend that instead. Just give yourself 2-3 days to spread out the driving.

4 responses so far

4 Responses to “Long distance moving rates are out of control”

  1. Aj of Earthon 11 May 2016 at 8:52 am

    Road trips are always preferred. Hire the movers and enjoy your travels. Or see if NASA can spot you that lift, heh.

    Also, are you considering a real relocation? Why those particular destinations? I recall you took a trip in recent years to Japan to instruct in English. And DC…?

    I’m also curious if it’s your plan to review either Captain America: Civil War if you’ve seen it, or perhaps X-Men: Apocalypse (yes please!) when it comes out in the next few weeks. I hope so. I saw you didn’t care for BvS, so definitely looking forward to one of these films inspiring you. Your analysis and review articles for solid films are always really insightful.

  2. B. McKenzieon 11 May 2016 at 5:29 pm

    I’ve visited Tokyo a few times. Definitely incredible for visiting, but Japanese business life is generally pretty brutal unless you’re working for yourself. I may have the skills to try that, but I’m not a millionaire (which in all seriousness is probably the most plausible way to get a work visa without an employer sponsoring you). I’ve worked in the DC area before (as the third-least-badass person on Pennsylvania Avenue*). I did not like the area all that much, but economically there are some advantages there (e.g. no visa required, the cost of living is fairly cheap deep in the suburbs, and going car-less might be viable).

    *After the President’s dog-walker and an FBI garage attendant.

    “I’m also curious if it’s your plan to review either Captain America: Civil War if you’ve seen it, or perhaps X-Men: Apocalypse (yes please!) when it comes out in the next few weeks.” I haven’t seen CW yet, but probably tomorrow or Friday. My assessment of the last Captain America movie was that it took itself more seriously than the characters could support, and the Civil War comics arc in general struck me as sort of pretentious (pot, kettle). The only good news here is that I think the Civil War angle gives them an opportunity to move on from HYDRA, which I think reached its sell-by-date about 2/3 through Captain America’s first movie (especially if they were planning on a more serious direction than Nazi mad scientists in face paint).



    I cynically placed bets on CA: Civil War to clear 75%+ on Rotten Tomatoes guessing that the movie would be politically charged enough that there’d be a lot of “thoughtfully and bravely explores new territory that happens to line up a lot with my political fantasies” reviews. There are no sure bets, but when it comes to politics in entertainment, that’s usually a safe one. (I also ran the table on BVS betting — I *always* take the under on Superman movies. I got destroyed by Deadpool, though – the trailer looked so bad I was going as low as “under 30%”).



    My bet for the new X-Men movie is 50-70%. Even for a superhero movie, this plot sounds unusually thin, and the villain sounds one-dimensional enough in the trailer that I’m not having much trouble setting expectations really low. (Which may be unfair. We’ve had something like 60 live-action superhero movies over the last 15 years, including 7 other X-Men movies, and very few of the villains are either notable contributors or notably original).

  3. Aj of Earthon 11 May 2016 at 10:20 pm

    “Even for a superhero movie, this plot sounds unusually thin, and the villain sounds one-dimensional enough in the trailer that I’m not having much trouble setting expectations really low.”

    Womp-womp. I’m really looking forward to it, but then I’m admittedly entirely biased to the X-Men. My personal affinity aside though (been reading since boyhood), I do feel their movies are generally of quality. I know these characters through and through, and I really enjoy and appreciate what’s been brought to the screen. Also kind of living for Psylocke, Archangel and Storm in the trailer…

    “The only good news here is that I think the Civil War angle gives them an opportunity to move on from HYDRA.”

    Yes, thank God. If I see one more mook in green leather and knee-high boots I may literally vomit from anger.

  4. B. McKenzieon 20 Nov 2016 at 11:55 am

    “I cynically placed bets on CA: Civil War to clear 75%+ on Rotten Tomatoes guessing that the movie would be politically charged enough that there’d be a lot of “thoughtfully and bravely explores new territory that happens to line up a lot with my political fantasies” reviews. There are no sure bets, but when it comes to politics in entertainment, that’s usually a safe one.”

    Rotten Tomatoes’ actual review synopsis:

    “Captain America: Civil War begins the next wave of Marvel movies with an action-packed superhero blockbuster boasting a decidedly non-cartoonish plot and the courage to explore thought-provoking themes.”

    Safe bet.

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