Archive for September 6th, 2011

Sep 06 2011

Erik Larsen’s Comic Book Submission Answers

I provide advice about how to write novels, comic books and graphic novels. Most of my content applies to fiction-writing in general, but I also provide articles specifically about superhero stories.

If you’re interested in submitting a comic book, particularly to Image, I would really recommend checking out these answers from Erik Larsen.

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Sep 06 2011

Google Queries (Superhero Teams, “Danger Nut” and Noncombat Options for Superheroes)

Should superhero teams include a flyer?  If you want to, that’s fine.  But flyers aren’t necessary.  I don’t think superhero teams need any particular kind of superhero (although comic book teams might have more visually interesting fights if they have at least one character that can do melee combat–purely ranged combat can get tedious).

 

What do superheroes need in their lives? Anything interesting.  Here are some possibilities that come to mind:

  • Action that is driven by interesting goals and personality traits.
  • Interesting conflicts, preferably some with characters that aren’t purely unsympathetic.  (For example, in X-Men: First Class, Mystique argues with Beast over Beast’s attempts to cure his mutation, and I don’t think that the writers pushed either position over the other).
  • Unusual decisions.
  • Relationships that influence the plot.
  • Maybe some goals and problems that don’t have much/anything to do with being a superhero—romance is one possibility, but you have a lot of options here.  (For example, in The Incredibles, one of the main problems for Dash was fitting in despite being supernaturally gifted).

 

How many characters can you introduce in a first chapter?  However many you can develop effectively.  Generally, I wouldn’t recommend introducing  more than 10 named characters or more than 5 major characters in the first 30 pages unless you are confident in your ability to develop interesting characters with relatively few lines.  Gradually introducing characters will generally give you a better chance to develop characters without overwhelming readers.

 

What games do sailors play?  Danger Nut. In terms of raw peril, it makes Navy football look like a ballet recital.

 

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