Sep 24 2010

Take THAT, M. Night Shyamalan

Published by at 10:24 am under Comedy

10 responses so far

10 Responses to “Take THAT, M. Night Shyamalan”

  1. Contra Gloveon 24 Sep 2010 at 11:14 am

    Quite funny, in my opinion.

  2. Lighting Manon 24 Sep 2010 at 11:40 am

    That was hilarious, heh.

    Yet also scary, the albino snake creature looked exactly like my sister-in-law, extremely similar appearances, plus, she too has a habit of flying directly at the camera.

  3. Milanon 24 Sep 2010 at 6:57 pm

    Horror works best when it just might be true.

    Great punchline. Makes no sense on so many levels. Like irony made of plastic.

  4. B. Macon 25 Sep 2010 at 10:22 am

    True story: My friends and I were at the movies and we saw an opening attraction for Devil (M. Night Shyamalan’s horror movie about people stuck in an elevator), and people were laughing. At first it was just a few people giggling, but it got pretty loud after MNS’s name was shown.

  5. Ragged Boyon 25 Sep 2010 at 10:36 am

    Is it really about them being stuck in an elevator? I thought that was just some aspect that comes along at some point. That sounds wack. I’m quite angry at Shymalan for what he did to The Last Airbender. The series was amazing, but the movie couldn’t nip the heels of the show. Although, the action was pretty good. Then again, it’s 2010, what action isn’t good?

  6. B. Macon 25 Sep 2010 at 11:35 am

    Umm, yeah, the premise of the movie is that several people are trapped in an elevator car with the Devil. Worst of all, it is brazenly obvious that the Devil is the killer, but the movie thinks that it’s being suspenseful by throwing out obvious red herrings (like “did the rich woman get killed by her husband’s employee for the insurance money?”–obviously not, given that we know the Devil is doing the killing).

  7. The ReTARDISed Whovianon 27 Sep 2010 at 6:37 pm

    I haven’t SEEN The Last Airbender and I have no intention of doing so. From what I’ve heard it has just been so intensely messed up that it makes no sense. They even cut the Kyoshi Warriors out, and they’re very important later on! Maybe it was for the best, given that Suki, the leader, looked about 30 in the pictures from the set and Sokka’s a teenager. And they’re meant to have a thing for each other! Ewww…

    I really hope they reboot it later, the way they did with the Hulk movies. Then I’ll go see it. The screenplay needs to be written by the creators or at least someone they choose to write it, the characters NEED to fit what they looked like in the show and say the names right! It’s AANG, not UNG. (facepalm)

  8. B. Macon 27 Sep 2010 at 7:29 pm

    “They even cut the Kyoshi Warriors out, and they’re very important later on!” Well, they had to cover a season of 20 episodes (about 450 minutes of airtime) in an 100 minute movie, so I think it’d be very hard to get everything in. I sorta wish they would’ve cut more, actually.



    A lot of plot elements would have to be pared down and/or removed to make the length, I think. Maybe ~75% of the first season, possibly more after factoring in that the movie might drag out the fight scenes for visual effect. The series doesn’t strike me as a particularly promising fit for a movie adaptation. For one thing, they didn’t have nearly as much screentime to work with as the Harry Potter or LOTR or even the Watchmen teams did. But I think the conventional wisdom is that younger viewers would have trouble handling a movie significantly longer than 1 hour and 45 minutes. (The actual age of the audience is older, I think, but they didn’t ask me).

    PS: I’d recommend seeing it. I found it quite horrible, but at least it’ll give you some more ideas about what precisely went wrong. (Good God, it was a long list).

  9. Trumwillon 05 Oct 2010 at 2:02 pm

    I am a fan of movies with twists, but one of the things that trips writers up is that everything revolves so closely around the twist that if you figure it out early or if you figure out that you just can’t figure it out because it’s going to come out of left field that it’s not particularly entertaining.

    I have a novel that is Shyamalanesque insofar as it does turn out the character has been dead the entire time (I started with it before MNS got started), but one of the things that I strived to do was make it interesting on its own merits even apart from the twist. The twist is simply the revelation of the main character as to why these supernatural elements have been following him around. I got the period where he’s freaking out over the fact that he’s talking to people that have died out of the way as having taken place before the novel starts. Tried to keep it something that the audience would be curious about, but it’s sort of a side question wherein the main question is the protagonist’s quest.

    Not sure how well I succeeded. The novel got so long that I basically split it into two and haven’t written the second installment. So people who have read the first novel don’t actually know the “twist” but so far nobody has objected. At least among my friends, they can accept supernatural elements simply being there without having to be explained in detail. I’m not sure how true that is with the larger public, though. When it came to LOST everyone wanted a scientific and logistical explanation for everything.

  10. B. Macon 05 Oct 2010 at 2:15 pm

    “I have a novel that is Shyamalanesque insofar as it does turn out the character has been dead the entire time (I started with it before MNS got started), but one of the things that I strived to do was make it interesting on its own merits even apart from the twist.” Good plan. That way, in case you come across an editor that isn’t quite feeling the twist, the story is still functional.

    In your case, I think the Sixth Sense is possibly sufficiently well-known that readers will be able to guess why the character sees dead people/supernatural elements.

    Also, you may able to plug the plot hole that Sixth Sense didn’t. How does Bruce Willis’ character go several days without talking to anybody but his one patient?

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