Archive for May 26th, 2014

May 26 2014

X-Men: Days of Future Past

Published by under Movie Review

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  • In my opinion, it was the best superhero movie this year (Amazing Spider-Man 2 and Captain America 2 so far). UPDATE: Not as good as Guardians of the Galaxy.
  • The action scene with the speedster (Quicksilver) was great, but I think it indicates how ridiculously hard it would be to use a speedster as anything but a one-off change of pace rather than a main character. Quicksilver spends the rest of the movie at home because his powers were strong enough that he would have broken the plot.
  • The plot holes are massive. SPOILERS:
    • The movie apparently isn’t sure how many people know about / are afraid of mutants. For example, at one point a government official claims that the whole mutant business in Cuba (X-Men: First Class) was “unconfirmed.” Several mutants employed by the CIA engaged several U.S. and USSR ships, with probably thousands of people witnessing a destroyer being telekinetically lifted from the sea and at least 10 military casualties. If mutants can get through that “unconfirmed,” I need to hire their publicist and/or defense attorney. Later on, there’s a scene where a U.S. businessman reveals to a (North) Vietnamese delegation that one of their members is a mutant and they instantly freak out. So… people do care what mutants are?
    • One recurring limitation of the X-Men series is that the plot is frequently driven by stupidity. For example, Dr. Trask has an apparently foolproof mutant-detection device but forgets to use it at a presidential press event. It works out as well as you’d imagine. Also, taking Magneto into custody is definitely an idiot ball — “maybe the next beyond-maximum-security prison we build for him will work better than the last twenty!”
    • Another recurring limitation of the X-Men series is that its characters are terribly uncreative when it comes to solving problems besides just killing people. For example, you’d think that a character with the ability to impersonate anyone would be able to come up with some more creative way to discredit a (criminal) scientist than martyring him and instantly vindicating his research. For example, exposing that he’s a criminal and/or committing outlandish acts while impersonating him? Or that he’s simultaneously offered to help a communist government AND forgot to bring his mutant-detection device to a presidential event attacked by mutants?
    • It is completely unbelievable that the final confrontation between Magneto, Mystique, and the President ends well for most mutants.

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